Amandus and Aelianus (285 or 286 A.D.)


In 285 or 286, insurgent peasants, whom history has called the Bagaudae, revolted against Roman rule in Gaul and in Spain. Amandus, also known as C.C. Amandus, one of the Bagaudae leaders, was raised to the purple; his right hand man was a certain Aelianus. It is unclear whether or not he was denoted a Caesar or an Augustus. Probably in 286 Maximianus Herculius, when he was made an Augustus by the Emperor Diocletian, repressed their revolt with the help of Carausius who threw off the Roman yoke later that year.

Bibliography

Barnes, T.D. New Empire of Diocletian and Constantine, (Cambridge, 1982), 10.

Cüppers, H. “Carausius.” Kl. P. 1: col. 1051-52.

Jones, A.H.M., J.R. Martindale, and J. Morris. “Aelianus 1.” The Prosopography of the Later Roman Empire, Cambridge, 1971, 1.17.

________. J.R. Martindale, and J. Morris. “Amandus 1.” The Prosopography of the Later Roman Empire, Cambridge, 1971, 1.50.

Kienast, Dietmar. Römische Kaisertabelle: Grundzüge einer römischen Kaiserchronologie, (Darmstadt, 1990) 272-273.

Seeck, O. “Aelianus (4).” RE 1.2: col. 482.

________. “Amandus (2).” RE 1.2: col. 1723.


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